Schedule for Third Week

Historical Positioning

The Historical Novel

Monday, 18 July

9:30-12:30

Focus Text: A Tale of Two Cities, Parts I & 2 (pages 5-254)

 

 

Discussion topics

  • Historical fiction; history and fiction; fiction as history; fictionalizing history

  • The French Revolution in fact and fiction

  • Historical contexts of literature and using literature to teach history

  • Past and present; history and literature; then and now

 

Scholarly Reading

  • Sorensen, David R. “‘The Unseen Heart of the Whole’: Carlyle, Dickens, and the Sources of the French Revolution in A Tale Of Two Cities.” Dickens Quarterly 30.1 (2013): 5-25. 

  • Hobsbawm, Eric. “The French Revolution.” The Age of Revolution. Vintage, 1996: 53-77

  • .Jones, Colin, Josephine McDonagh, and Jon Mee. “A Tale of Two Cities in Context.” Charles Dickens, A Tale of Two Cities, and the French Revolution. Ed. Colin Jones, Josephine McDonagh, and Jon Mee. Palgrave, 2009.1-23.

Politics and Ethics

Tuesday, 19 July

9:30-12:30

Focus Text: A Tale of Two Cities, Part III (pages 255-390)

 

 

Discussion topics

  • Representing revolution

  • Families, communities, and the individual

  • The ethical dilemma

  • Social unrest, social surveillance, social order

 

Contextual Reading

  • Thomas Carlyle, from The French Revolution. Modern Library Classics, 2002.

 

Scholarly Readings

  • Stedman Jones, Gareth. “The Redemptive Power of Violence? Carlyle, Marx and Dickens.” Charles Dickens, A Tale of Two Cities, and the French Revolution. Ed. Colin Jones, Josephine McDonagh, and Jon Mee. Palgrave, 2009. 41-63.

  • Baldridge, Cates. “Alternatives to Bourgeois Individualism in A Tale Of Two Cities.” Critical Essays on Charles Dickens’s A Tale of Two Cities. 168-186. New York, NY: G. K. Hall, 1998.

  • Schor, Hilary. “Hard Times and A Tale of Two Cities: The Social Inheritance of Adultery.” Dickens and the Daughter of the House. Cambridge U P, 1999. 70-100.

Past and Present

Wednesday, 20 July

9:30-12:30

Focus Text: A Tale of Two Cities

 

Discussion topics

  • History and literature

  • Critical receptions of A Tale of Two Cities

  • Critical legacies of A Tale of Two Cities

 

Reviews and Critical Assessments

  • George Orwell, “Charles Dickens.” Inside the Whale and Other Essays. Penguin, 1969.

  • Selected 19th-century reviews of A Tale of Two Cities.

 

Scholarly Readings

  • Stoehr, Taylor. From Dickens: The Dreamer's Stance. Ithaca: Cornell UP, 1965.

  • Daleski, H. M. “Imagining Revolution: The Eye of History and of Fiction.” Journal of Narrative Technique 18.1 (1988): 61-72.

  • Griffiths, Devin. “The Comparative History of A Tale Of Two Cities.” ELH 80.3 (2013): 811-838.

 

Preliminary Project Reports

Be prepared to discuss the current state of your final seminar project!

 

Terror

Thursday, 21 July

9:30-12:30 (Seminar)

2:30-4:30 (Optional Pedagogy Workshop)

Focus Text: A Tale of Two Cities

 

Discussion topics

  • Historical context and cultural significance

  • Terrorism

  • The Indian “Mutiny” and the revolutions of the 1850s

 

Scholarly Readings

  • Joshi, Priti. “Mutiny Echoes: India, Britons, and Charles Dickens’ A Tale Of Two Cities.” A Library of Essays on Charles Dickens: Global Dickens. 435-474. Farnham, England: Ashgate, 2012.

  • Herbert, Christopher. “Moral Insanity.” War of No Pity: the Indian Mutiny and Victorian Trauma. Princeton U P, 2008. 213-38.

  • Ferguson, Frances. “On Terrorism and Morals: Dickens’s A Tale of Two Cities.” Partial Answers: Journal of Literature and the History of Ideas 3.2 (2005): 49-74.

  • Mangum, Teresa. “Dickens and the Female Terrorist: The Long Shadow of Madame Defarge.” Nineteenth-Century Contexts 31.2 (2009): 143-160.

 

Optional Afternoon Workshop 3 (2:30-4:30): “Digital Dickens”

         Dr. Jon Varese joins us for a discussion of digital technologies in/and the classroom.